Gender and mining governance

In this course, you will learn how to foster women’s equal engagement in mining projects, how to take action to eliminate gender-based violence in affected communities, and understand how investment in gender equality and women’s leadership in mining governance can lead to stable and resilient communities.

Course starts: 2 November 2020
Course ends: 27 November 2020
Duration: 4 weeks
Estimated effort: 2 – 3 hours per week
Type: Massive online open course
Languages: English

Contact course coordinator Course syllabus Meet the experts FAQs

 

Do you need to make a stronger case for amplifying women’s voices in mining governance? Do you want to become more skilled at evaluating the impact of mining projects on communities, with a particular emphasis on women? Are you looking for recommendations on eliminating gender-based violence in mining operations and mining-affected communities? Are you interested in promoting or increasing investment in gender equality in mining governance, and not sure where to start?  

United Nations Development Programme, Environmental Governance Programme, and Intergovernmental Forum on Mining, Minerals, Metals and Sustainable Development are pleased to offer a FREE Massive Online Open Course (MOOC) on Gender and Mining Governance. This four-week course facilitated in English compiles research from leading institutions in the industry to build awareness and skills in regards to gender governance in the mining industry. 

Course highlights and outcomes

  • Gain the skills to build a strong case for strengthening women’s engagement in mining governance 
  • Interact with experts who are actively engaged in promoting gender equality in the mining industry
  • Join the community-of-practice committed to increasing women’s meaningful engagement in mining projects
  • Take a deep dive into rich learning materials
  • Receive a certificate of completion from the course partners

Learning objectives

By the time the course is completed, you will be able to:

  • Understand and evaluate the impact of mining projects on communities, with a particular emphasis on projects’ impact on women 
  • Assess the importance and benefits of women’s participation and engagement in mining projects for communities, companies and governments
  • Outline the measures you can take to effectively eliminate gender-based violence in mining operations and mining-affected communities
  • Understand how investment in gender in mining governance can lead to stable and resilient communities

Course topics

The course will cover the following topics: 

  • Lesson 1: Introduction to Gender and Mining Governance
  • Lesson 2: Women’s Participation in Decision-Making in the Mining Sector
  • Lesson 3: Gender-Based Violence in the Mining Sector
  • Lesson 4: Investment in Gender in Mining Governance

Course completion requirements

To receive the certificate of course completion, participants must:

  • Complete four online lessons
  • Pass four weekly quizzes 
  • Listen to all course lectures
  • Pass the final test
  • Complete the course survey

Click “Enroll” to register today. You will receive an orientation email with all the information in preparation for the course on 26 October 2020.

If you have any questions, please contact the Learning for Nature team at [email protected].

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NABILAH HARAHAP

Hi Everyone
My name is Nabilah from Indonesia, just graduated from University as Geological Engineer, and I am so passionate about mining Industry. I look forward to learning more about Gender and Mining Governance and women equality in mining projects.

Kasazi Nyendwa

Hi Everyone, my name is Kasazi Lotuno Nyendwa from Kafue, Zambia. I am a small scale Miner mining Amethyst in Mapatizya Kalomo and also add value to the Amethyst. I would like to participate in this course because I interact alot with the community where we Mine from and would like to learn more on mining governance and strengthen my capacity as a woman miner as well as help other women Miners in our mining community strengthen their capacity as well. Thank you and looking forward to meeting all of you.

Travis October

Hey, Everyone, My name is Travis October I am a Geological Engineer from Guyana, South America. I am currently employed with the Guyana Environmental Protection Agency but spent most of my professional career working with Large scale mining operations in the interior regions of Guyana. I wish each participant of this course luck and I hope everyone is staying safe during this difficult time with Covid-19, looking forward to working with and getting to know everyone

Regards,
Travis October

Luqman SAKA

Hello everyone, am Luqman SAKA. Am an Associate Professor and I teach African politics, Comparative Federalism and Conflict Management at the Department of Political Science, University of Ilorin, Nigeria. I have research and published in the area of Conflict and Peace, Oil Politics, Elections and Gender Issue with particular reference to Girl Child Education and violence against Women.
I look forward to a fulfilling learning experience.

Judith Buaba

Hi everyone, I am Judith Buaba, a mining engineering student from Ghana. I am excited to learn something new from this course.

Hello dear course mates, I am Elizabeth from Cameroon, glad to be part of this course.

Diana Cabrera

Hello to everyone,
My name is Diana Cabrera from Ecuador, M&E and Gender Technician. Looking forward to the course

Salli Swartz

Hi
I am Salli Swartz a French American international lawyer practicing in Paris France; I have spent over 30 years giving advice to Governments in the mining and extractive industry sectors. I am also a feminist and active in many associations supporting women in industy.

Samuel Odhiambo

Hi, I am Samuel Odhiambo, a journalist and Communication specialist from Kenya. It’s my pleasure to be part of the trainee and learner in this important course. Iam surely looking forward for rich knowledge in Gender and Mining Governance.

varlee kamara

Hey, I am Varlee Kermon Kamara, a professional Liberian Mining Engineer and Mineral Beneficiation practitioner. I am very excited for the opportunity to be a part of the online Gender and Mining Governance training course. I look forward to learning more about Gender and Mining Governance relative to standard Mining Laws and Contracts.

Course Syllabus

Week 1Week 2Week 3Week 4

Week 1

Week 1 provides an overview of a wide range of gendered impacts of the mining sector on communities and outlines the framework for evaluating this impact, with a particular emphasis on women.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 1: Introduction to Gender and Mining Governance

Objectives:

  • Discuss the reasons behind a systematic exclusion of women’s participation in mining operations
  • Describe the key gendered impacts of mining on affected communities
  • Outline the framework for evaluating the impact of mining on affected communities, with a particular emphasis on women

Quiz 1: Introduction to Gender and Mining Governance

Quiz 1 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 1.

REQUIRED: Lectures

  • Nora Gotzmann, Danish Institute of Human Rights
  • Flaviano Bianchini, Source International
  • Laura Grassi, Source International

RECOMMENDED: Case studies

  • The costs of ignoring women’s voice in mining governance in Thailand
  • Gender Impact Assessment of artisanal and small-scale mining in Tanzania
  • Women’s engagement scheme in Lao People’s Democratic Republic

OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. To what extent are women in your country engaged in the mining labor force? If the engagement level is low, what could be some of the reasons behind women’s exclusion? 
  2. How are communities affected by mining operations in your country? Are the impacts of mining different for women from mining communities? If so, describe how they are different.
  3. Imagine you are tasked with conducting a gender impact assessment to evaluate the impact of mining operations on women in your region. What resources will you need at your disposal to realise this task? What challenges do you anticipate to face as you are working on this assessment?

Week 2 explains the importance of women’s equal and meaningful representation in resource extraction projects not only for women's economic empowerment and social development, but also for the sustainability and success of mining operations, and provides recommendations for various stakeholders to facilitate this engagement.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 2: Women’s Participation in Decision-Making in the Mining Sector

Objectives:

  • Outline the benefits of women’s participation in the mining workforce and their engagement in community decision-making in mining projects 
  • Provide recommendations for governments, companies and civil society organizations to facilitate equal representation and engagement of women in mining governance, and to improve women’s employment in the mining sector

Quiz 2: Women’s Participation in Decision-Making in the Mining Sector

Quiz 2 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 2.

REQUIRED: Lectures

  • Gillian Davidson, Chair of the Board of International Women in Mining
  • Javier Blanco, Sustantum
  • Rickard Nätjehall, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
  • Ortrun Merkle, United Nations University

RECOMMENDED: Case studies

  • Gender diversity approach at Anglo American
  • Gender equity policy in the mining sector in Colombia
  • Women’s empowerment programs by Tethyan Copper Company (TCC) in Pakistan
  • The role of civil society in mining operations in Canada

OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. Imagine you are asked with making a case for increasing women’s inclusion in the mining industry to your government and/or a mining company in your area. What would be your main argument?
  2. Imagine you are asked with proposing interventions for increasing women’s inclusion in the mining industry to your government and/or a mining company in your area. What would your proposal look like, and why would those interventions be particularly important in your context?
  3. Imagine you are asked with proposing interventions for increasing the participation of women from mining-affected communities in the decision-making processes in mining projects that affect their livelihoods, safety, customs and traditions. What would your proposal look like, and why would those interventions be particularly important in your context?

Week 3 focuses on gender-based violence in communities affected by mining operations, and provides recommendations and tools to effectively mitigate the risks of gender-based violence for the affected populations.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 3: Gender-Based Violence in the Mining Sector

Objectives:

  • Outline the reasons for an increase in gender-based violence in mining-affected communities
  • Explain the impacts of gender-based violence on women’s livelihoods in mining-affected communities
  • Provide recommendations for stakeholders for the elimination of gender-based violence in mining-affected communities

Quiz 3: Gender-Based Violence in the Mining Sector

Quiz 3 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 3.

REQUIRED: Lectures

  • Ege Tekinbas, Intergovernmental Forum on Mining, Minerals, Metals and Sustainable Development
  • TBD

RECOMMENDED: Case studies

  • Gender-based violence in mining-affected communities in Mongolia
  • Gender-based violence and Inuit women in mining-affected communities in Canada
  • Police brutality around the Porgera Gold Mine, Papua New Guinea

OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. Have you observed a correlation between the prevalence of gender based-violence and mining operations in your country/region? If so, what do you think are some of the reasons for this dynamic in your context?
  2. In your context, how do you see your role in preventing gender-based violence in mining communities and/or mining labor force? 

Week 4 explains how investment in gender in mining governance can lead to stable and resilient communities that are able to minimize the risks of mining activities while maximizing their benefits for women, men, girls and boys.

REQUIRED: Lesson and Quiz

Lesson 4: Investment in Gender in Mining Governance

Objectives:

  • Outline the conditions that need to be set in place for a favorable environment for investment in gender in mining
  • Describe how governments, mining companies and civil society can work together to boost investment in gender equality in mining
  • Propose guidelines for governments, mining companies and civil society on increasing investment in gender in mining

Quiz 4: Investment in Gender in Mining Governance

Quiz 4 checks your comprehension of the material covered in Lesson 4.

REQUIRED: Lectures

TBD

RECOMMENDED: Case studies

TBD

OPTIONAL: Discussion forum

  1. Lesson 4 outlines the framework that governments can follow to boost investment in gender equality in mining. What do you anticipate to be the primary challenges for your government when it comes to implementing this framework, and how can companies and civil society help bring it to successful implementation?  
  2. Imagine you are tasked with boosting investment in gender in the mining industry in your country. How would you bring all the relevant stakeholders (including mining companies and civil society) together to start tackling this task? 

Course Experts

Flaviano Bianchini is the founder of Source International. Flaviano is an environmentalist and naturalist. An Ashoka Fellow from 2012, Flaviano specialized in Management and Valorization of Natural Resources at the University of Pisa and holds a Master’s degree in Human Rights and Conflict Management from the Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies. 

Flaviano is experienced in addressing human rights violations and the health impacts of the extractive industries, particularly in Latin America. His studies of the impact of mining on the environment and health led to the modification of the mining law in Honduras, the adoption of precautionary measures by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in Guatemala, and the approval of laws on the welfare of the city of Cerro de Pasco in Peru. Between 2007 and 2009, he conducted an awareness campaign on the impact of mining activity in Latin America, in collaboration with Amnesty International.

In 2008, Flaviano was named the Environmental candidate of the year by The New Ecology magazine. He received the Social Worker award from the University of San Carlos of Guatemala in 2006 and the Chatwin Prize in 2010 for his book, In Tibet: Un Viaggio Clandestino.

 


Javier M. Blanco is a sustainable development specialist working on environmental governance and women’s issues, SDGs policy analysis, and green entrepreneurship. Javier currently works as Sustainability Consultant at Sustantum, a newly-created sustainability firm in Spain. Prior to Sustantum, Javier has worked with UNDP, UN Women, and FAO, in Colombia, Panama, Italy, and Belgium, for UN country offices, as well as for Regional Hubs such as the ones for Latin America and the Caribbean of UNDP and FAO. Javier holds a MSc in Environmental Studies (Lund University, Sweden), and a BSc in Law and Business Administration (Complutense University, Spain).

 


Matthew Bliss is a sustainability and mining executive with extensive international natural resources and community development experience. His focus is on integrating sustainability and good governance into all aspects of mining, natural resource management and community development. Currently focused on IGF programs and implementation, including environmental and mine closure guidance, demand-driven technical support and capacity building supporting members in Eastern Europe and Asia-Pacific.

 


Chunnian Chen is a Programme Research Analyst working for the Environmental Governance Programme on integrating environment and human rights into the governance of the mining sector. Chunnian is experienced in poverty eradication, inequality reduction, and impact financing for sustainable development. Chunnian holds a Master’s degree in Economic Development from Northeastern University in the USA. Her interests include environmental justice, gender equality, and climate solutions.

 


Gillian Davidson is a leader in sustainability, ESG and responsible supply chains with extensive experience in the extractives and natural resources sectors. She is currently a sustainability advisor to global companies and international organisations and a Non-Executive Director of New Gold Inc and Central Asia Metals. Gillian is Chair of International Women in Mining, co-chair of the Resolve Natural Resources and Energy Leadership Council, member of the executive of the Global Battery Alliance and a fellow of Chatham House. Previously, Gillian was the Head of Mining & Metals at the World Economic Forum and held senior roles in major mining companies and government. She holds a PhD in Development Economics and Geography.

 


Sanna Due is a Policy Advisor working at the Bureau of Policy and Programme support at UNDP as an expert from the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. She currently serves as Programme Coordinator for the Environmental Governance Programme (EGP), the Sida-funded programme that aims to advance the human rights and environment nexus by strengthening the environmental governance of the mining sector, ultimately advancing multiple Sustainable Development Goals.

Sanna has over 20 years of experience working with environmental public administration at national and regional agencies in Sweden and Denmark. Her work has focused on developing and implementing policy instruments in the areas of sustainable consumption and production, circular economy, air pollution, and engagement with the private sector in the Nordic countries and the European Union. Sanna holds a Master’s of Science degree in Environmental Planning and Design.

 


Anna George is Programme Manager at the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency in Stockholm, Sweden. She has around 20 years of experience as programme manager and advisor in the area of institutional capacity-building for environmental administration, human rights and social sectors. She has previously worked in the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), the Swedish Ministry of the Environment and the Swedish Marine and Water Agency. She has lived and worked in China for five years. Anna holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in East Asian Studies and Political Science and a Master of Science degree in Environmental Science with a focus on the environment, communication and politics.

 


Nora Götzmann is a Senior Adviser at the Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR), focusing on business and human rights. She is also an Adjunct Researcher at the Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining (CSRM) of the Sustainable Minerals Institute at the University of Queensland, Australia. Nora has over 10 years of experience working with multinational companies on implementing human rights due diligence, focusing primarily on the extractive industries, across a range of international corporate and site-level settings. I also work with national human rights institutions, civil society actors and financial institutions on various business and human rights related topics.

Prior to joining the DIHR, Nora worked at the CSRM, where her work focused on human rights due diligence and community-company grievance resolution.

 


Laura Grassi is an environmental specialist in contaminated sites, air and water quality, and environmental health. She spent the last 5 years working on different case studies, especially related to mining (coal and polymetallic mines), oil and gas extraction, and agribusiness (palm oil, sugar cane, rubber). Laura has conducted capacity building activities for communities and grassroots organizations in Guatemala, Liberia, Mozambique, Mexico, and Perù.

 


Rickard Nätjehall is a Policy Officer at the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, where he works with the bilateral cooperation with the Russian Federation, the Barents’ Council, and with anti-corruption as part of the Agency’s global Environmental Governance Programme. 

Previously, Rickard has worked with anti-corruption and water management at the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), African refugees in Israel, and social protection schemes in South Africa. Rickard has a Master’s degree (Cum Laude) in Political Science – Comparative Politics from the Radboud University in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

 


Caroline Ngonze has extensive experience in the mining sector, having worked on phase I of the UNDP implemented ACP-EU Development Minerals Programme, leading the gender equality and women’s empowerment programming for 41 ACP countries. Prior to that, Caroline worked at UNECA, leading research and policy analysis on women in artisanal and small-scale mining in Ghana, Guinea, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Zambia with a wide cross-section of stakeholders. Caroline is an alumna of the 2015 edition of the Emerging Leaders in African Mining (ELAM) program as well as a member of the International Women in Mining (IWiM) Network.

 


Giovanni De Nicola is an environmental economist. During his university career he delved into several aspects related to oil production, focusing specifically on social and economic impacts of the industry on local communities. The regional focus of Giovanni’s research included the Basilicata region in southern Italy, the location of the biggest oil field in continental Europe. Giovanni has contributed to multiple projects studying the potential impacts and the future of oil production in the Mediterranean Sea.

 


Ann-Cathrin Pedersen is a project manager for the Environmental Governance Programme at UNDP. She has spent the past decade working on sustainable development and humanitarian aid, covering thematic areas such as governance, environment, extractives and health. She has worked extensively with human-rights based and participatory governance issues, from within the public sector, NGOs and the UN. Over the past five years she has focused on rights-based approaches to environmental governance. She has a multi-disciplinary background and holds a Master’s degree in Middle East Studies from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

 


Ege Tekinbas is a Gender Equality Advisor with IISD’s Economic Law and Policy Program. She has over 15 years of professional experience in gender equality and women’s empowerment, elimination of violence against women, and social development. Throughout her lengthy career with international organizations (including UN Women, United Nations Population Fund, World Bank, European Union, the Council of Europe, and Fundación Internacional y para Iberoamérica de Administración y Políticas Públicas), Ege has engaged in program/project design in areas such as gender analysis, gender-responsive programming, and monitoring of gender-responsive service delivery.

Among previous professional roles, Ege has acted as Senior Gender Consultant at the World Bank (where she was involved with assessing gender-based violence-related risks of major civil works and infrastructure projects) and Senior Gender Consultant at UN WOMEN. In the latter position, she developed a program targeting refugee women and girls, supported the development of strategic plans, and researched the capacity-building needs of women’s organizations and community service organizations working with women refugees, along with social entrepreneurship modalities available for refugee women.

 


Fitsum S. Weldegiorgis is a senior research consultant with affiliations as an Associate with International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) and an Industry Fellow with Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI) at the University of Queensland (UQ).
Previously, Fitsum led Artisanal and Small-scale Mining (ASM) work in his role as a Senior Researcher at IIED. Before this, he worked as a Researcher with SMI for several years conducting applied research on socio-economic impact of large-, medium- and small-scale mining.
Fitsum has a long track record of conducting applied research, strategy designs, multi-stakeholder action dialogues, and building capacity, leadership and partnerships through various projects.

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